Tag: shakespeare

10 Examples of Irony in Shakespeare

Examples of Irony in Shakespeare Shakespeare is one of the prevailing masters of irony – he uses dramatic, situational, and verbal irony in such a way that few others have been able to replicate. Truly, when one talks about irony,…

Hamlet Act-I, Scene-III Study Guide

Plot Overview This scene takes place at the residence of Polonius in a room in the castle of Elsinore. His son, Laertes, offers overprotective advice to his sister, Ophelia, who is in love with Prince Hamlet. However, his tone shows…

Something is Rotten in the State of Denmark

Origin This phrase is taken from William Shakespeare’s play Hamlet. The speaker is Marcellus, a guard, who talks to his philosophical comrade, Horatio, saying, “Something is rotten in the state of Denmark …“ (Act-I, Scene-IV). The reason of saying this…

Hamlet Act-I, Scene-II Study Guide

This scene opens in the court of King Claudius. The king is engaged in preaching ethics to his family members and courtiers regarding balancing life between sorrows and everyday preoccupations. He vows to combine and sustain the grief he feels…

Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow

Origin This is one of the more famous speeches written by Shakespeare, and delivered his famous character, Macbeth, in the play of the same title. He says this to indicate that another day in his life would be just a…

The Winter of Our Discontent

Origin William Shakespeare has used this phrase in his popular play, Richard III, where King Richard is expressing his feelings of discontent regarding living in the world that hates him. He begins his soliloquy by stating, “Now is the winter…

That Way Madness Lies

Origin The origin of this phrase is tracked in William Shakespeare’s King Lear. King Lear speaks this line to Kent, to express his grief for his daughters’ selfish and cruel behavior. He says, “Your old kind father, whose frank heart…

There is a Tide in the Affairs of Men

Origin This phrase has been taken from Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar, where Brutus talks to Cassius saying, “There is a tide in the affairs of men. Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune” (Act-IV, Scene-III). Brutus means to say…

The Quality of Mercy is Not Strain’d

Origin This phrase is taken from Shakespeare’s The Merchant of Venice. It occurs where Portia demands Shylock be merciful, stating that “The quality of mercy is not strain’d, It droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven/Upon the place beneath” (Act-IV,…

Star-crossed Lovers

Origin Like several other phrases, this phrase has been selected from Shakespeare’s famous play, Romeo and Juliet. This phrase is illustrating a couple whose bond of love is destined to fail. Its origin seems to be astrological, but it is…