Tag: metaphor

Romeo and Juliet Metaphor

A hidden, implicit or implied comparison between two seemingly unrelated things is called a metaphor. In other words, a metaphor is a figure of speech in which two strikingly different concepts or things are likened to one another based on…

You Are What You Eat

Origin of “You are What You Eat” The exact source of this phrase is unknown but it is said that Anthelme Brillat-Savarin used this phrase in his book, “Physiologie du Gout, ou Meditations de Gastronomie Transcendante” published in 1826 and…

Raining Cats and Dogs

Origin Although the definite origin of this phrase in unknown, it seems a likely derivation from some natural phenomenon. There are, however, some fanciful and proposed derivations. It was Jonathan Swift, who first used it in his satirical poem, A…

Every Cloud has a Silver Lining

Origin John Milton coined this phrase for the first time in his masque “Comus.” It reads as, “Turn forth her silver lining on the night, And casts a gleam over this tufted grove.” Following Milton, it again appeared in The…

Silence is Golden

Origin Like many other phrases, the origin of this phrase also lies in the mist of time. It is reported that it has links with some other versions of the proverb, dating back to Egyptian history. However, its first example…

Tomorrow, and tomorrow, and tomorrow

Origin This is one of the more famous speeches written by Shakespeare, and delivered his famous character, Macbeth, in the play of the same title. He says this to indicate that another day in his life would be just a…

The Winter of Our Discontent

Origin William Shakespeare has used this phrase in his popular play, Richard III, where King Richard is expressing his feelings of discontent regarding living in the world that hates him. He begins his soliloquy by stating, “Now is the winter…

A Thing of Beauty is a Joy For Ever

Origin This phrase is taken from John Keats’s poem, Endymion. It is the opening line that begins the poem as, “A thing of beauty is a joy for ever: Its loveliness increases; it will never.” This line implies that, as…

There is a Tide in the Affairs of Men

Origin This phrase has been taken from Shakespeare’s Julius Caesar, where Brutus talks to Cassius saying, “There is a tide in the affairs of men. Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune” (Act-IV, Scene-III). Brutus means to say…