Ideas to Write Greetings on a Father’s Day card

One of the most important annual days is ‘Father’s Day’. Mother’s Day falls on different dates in the United States and the United Kingdom and other countries. In the same way, there is no set a date for the celebration of Father’s Day and the days also varies as per the country and culture. Father’s Day was celebrated during the middle ages too. March 19th’s feast of Saint Joseph was considered as Father’s Day as he was Father of Catholicism. However, it was not until the 20th century; many countries’ began to celebrate Father’s Day just as they complement Mother’s Day. Most common dates to celebrate Father’s Day is June’s second Sunday. There many countries which celebrate the same on the first or the third Sunday of June.

Similar to other wishes and greetings, Father’s Day wishes are also very prominent every year. Father’s Day is not a limited biological father. A step-father and any parental male figure in a person’s life play a role of a father. You can wish your relatives, uncle, and grandparents who have children too.

For Father

Most father’s do everything they can to provide for their family, especially children. Children save money throughout the year to give something special. More than a present on Father’s Day, a handwritten note will melt your father’s heart.

  • Happy Father’s Day, dad. Thank you for being my hero.
  • Dearest Dad/Father/Papa, my appreciations will fall short but thank you so much for giving me life and the best one of all. Happy Father’s Day.
  • There’s no possible way I could pay you back for all that you have done for me growing up. I wouldn’t be what I am today without you. Thank you so much for everything, Papa/Dad/Daddy.
  • Dearest Papa/Dad/Daddy, You are my hero, my inspiration, my best friend. Happy Father’s Day.
  • I didn’t need a Father’s Day to express my gratitude but the older I get, the more I understand you. So I want to take this opportunity and wish you a Happy Father’s Day.

For grandfather

You can also take time to wish your maternal grandfather as well as the paternal grandfather. You can thank them for bringing their parents into this world and instilling them with the values that your parents have passed to you.

  • A grand day to my grandfather. Much love to you, Gramps/Grandpa/Papa.
  • You are my true inspiration, Gramps/Grandpa/Papa. Happy Father’s Day.
  • To the man who will always hold a special place in my heart. Gramps/Grandpa/Papa, Happy Father’s Day.
  • It’s a blessing to have you our guidance with all of us. We love you, Gramps/Grandpa/Papa.
  • To the man who is our strength, our happiness, and our guide to wisdom. Happy Father’s Day, Gramps/Grandpa/Papa.

For Husband

After marriage, man’s life is changed the moment he becomes a father. A spouse can always use this opportunity to wish the husband and make them feel special. It doesn’t matter if he is celebrating Father’s day for the first time or he has welcomed a grandchild.

  • You are the best husband I could ask for my kids. Happy Father’s Day.
  • Thank you for all the sacrifices you are making and the lengths to which you are going for the happiness of our family. Happy Father’s Day.
  • We are so fortunate to have you in our lives. I am so proud of the father you’ve become and the wonderful husband you are. Happy Father’s Day, my love!
  • Thank you so much for always being there for us. We love you.
  • Let’s celebrate this day to let you know how amazing husband and loving father you are. You are the best. Happy Father’s Day.

For brother

There is always a special bonding between siblings. If you are a brother or a sister to a sibling who is raising children, it is important to let them know how proud you are for his dedication for their children. Father’s Day is just the right opportunity.

  • You have grown up to be a fine man and an incredible father just like ours — happy Father’s Day little brother.
  • You have always been a father figure to me big brother, and now I can see how much of a great father you are to your children. Happy Father’s Day.
  • Of course, Father’s Day is a special day, this year it means more because now you’re there among the best dads.
  • It makes me so happy to see you doing an excellent job at being the best father to my nephew/niece/s. Happy Father’s Day.
  • I always knew you would be the greatest dad one day.

For son

A father of a grown-up son(s) always finds a way to appreciate him/them and carry immense pride to see them complete their education, get a job, and settle down. However, watching them become a father doubles the joy. Father’s Day is surely the right time to wish the son(s) and share each other’s happiness.

  • So very proud of you and the kind of father you have become. Happy Father’s Day.
  • No matter how much of a great dad, you become, you will always be my baby. Happy Father’s Day.
  • You are growing up to be exactly like your dad. And we are so proud of you, my son. Happy Father’s Day.
  • Now that you are a dad, perhaps you will better understand our parenthood. Happy Father’s Day.
  • We are so lucky to have you as a son and your kids even luckier to have you as their father.

A Doll’s House Quotes

Quotations or quotes are representative phrases and sentences that highlight the main ideas and beliefs writers use to convey the same to the audience. Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House has various quotes that show its themes, ideas, and opinions. Some of the quotes from A Doll’s House have been analyzed below.

Quotes in A Doll’s House

Quote #1

“Yes – some day, perhaps, after many years, when I am no longer as pretty as I am now. Don’t laugh at me! I mean, of course, when Torvald is no longer as devoted to me as he is now; when my dancing and dressing-up and reciting have palled on him then it may be a good thing to have something in reserve.”

Act-I

Nora, the protagonist of the play, speaks these words in response to Mrs. Linde’s question. She asks her if she is ready to face Torvald in the future and tells her the real story behind the debt. She also tells her that in a few years, she will lose her beauty and Torvald will also lose his feelings of love for her. Then she will have this story to tell him and that she will preserve this story for that time. These lines are significant as they show Nora’s realistic character.

Quote #2

“To be able to be free from care, quite free from care; to be able to play and romp with the children; to be able to keep the house beautifully and have everything just as Torvald likes it!”

Act-I

In the first act, Nora is with Mrs. Linde. She expresses that she will be free from cares and worries after she has paid the debt to Krogstad. In fact, she sees the happiness of Torvald in making the house beautiful instead of her own. These lines are significant as they show dramatic irony because she is unaware of how Torvald would react when he comes to know about her debt.

Quote #3

“Your squirrel would run about and do all her tricks if you would be nice and do as she wants.”

Act-II

Nora is trying to distract her husband, Torvald as tries to hide the truth of her debt and also keep Krogstad at the bank before he spills her secret.

Quote #4

“It is no use lying to one’s self. I am the most wretched of all my patients, Mrs. Helmer. Lately, I have been taking stock of my internal economy. Bankrupt!”

Act-II

Dr. Rank is speaking to Nora and tells her that her husband Torvald is going to die soon. As the doctor says these words, Nora realizes that they loved each other so much, and they have been lying to protect each other. This is also an example of irony.

Quote #5

“How should you understand it? A wonderful thing is going to happen!”

Act-II

Nora is speaking to Mrs. Linde when she confesses that she cannot understand many things. While saying these words, she hopes that her husband Torvald could take responsibility for her action and perhaps clear her name from the bank after forging her father’s signature. However, that does not happen, and she decides to leave her husband.

Quote #6

“Why shouldn’t I look at my dearest treasure? – at all the beauty that is mine, all my very own?”

Act-III

Torvald Helmer speaks these lines to charm his wife, Nora. These lines show that he loves her very much as he praises her. It also shows that he loves her as his possession instead of a human being. However, Dr. Rank treats her as equal and adores her when she is not dressed in fancy clothes.

Quote #7

“There is a big black hat — have you never heard of hats that make you invisible? If you put one on, no one can see you.”

Act-III

Dr. Rank speaks to Nora in ambiguous language that only both of them can understand. He means that her husband Torvald, would not understand this language. Dr. Rank means that he will be dead as he would not be attending the next fancy-dress ball. Therefore, the black hat here means death.

Quote #8

“Do you know, Nora, I have often wished that you might be threatened by some great danger, so that I might risk my life’s blood, and everything, for your sake.”

Act-III

Torvald says these words under the influence of Nora’s beauty in the fabulous dress she is wearing. He vows to save her from any danger even if he would have to risk his own life. However, his resolution seems to surpass Nora’s expectations. Once he learns about the Krogstad’s debt, he disowns her but tells her to continue to live with him for the sake of his reputation.

Quote #9

“From this moment, happiness is not the question; all that concerns us is to save the remains, the fragments, the appearance.”

Act-III

After vowing to save her from any difficult times, Torvald comes to know about the debt and tells her that he does not accept her now as he has to save the rest of the things. He, however, tells her that he would keep her in the house but not as his wife or mother of their children. Instead, they would live together as a husband and wife only to show it to the world.

Quote #10

“I have existed merely to perform tricks for you, Torvald. But you wanted it like that. You and father have committed a great sin against me. It is your fault that I have made nothing of my life. our home has been nothing but a playroom. I have been your doll-wife, just as at home I was father’s doll-child; and here the children have been my dolls.”

Act-III

Nora speaks these lines to Torvald to make him realize that she has been a doll for him and not a wife. She has sacrificed her desires and education to perform her role just like she has been a doll by being a perfect daughter for her father. As she is a doll in relation, she also treats children as her dolls. In fact, she regrets that he has not considered her an equal partner in marriage.

Success is Counted Sweetest

Success is Counted Sweetest

by Emily Dickinson

Success is counted sweetest
By those who ne’er succeed.
To comprehend a nectar
Requires sorest need.

Not one of all the purple Host
Who took the Flag today
Can tell the definition
So clear of victory

As he defeated – dying –
On whose forbidden ear
The distant strains of triumph
Burst agonized and clear!

Summary of Success is Counted Sweetest

  • Popularity of “Success is Counted Sweetest”: This poem was written by Emily Dickinson, a great American poet. ‘Success is Counted Sweetest’ is a popular poem because of its themes of success and failure. It was first published in 1864. The poem speaks about the value of success and illustrates that those who have tasted failure can truly feel the real essence of success. The poem also unveils the painful truths of human desire.
  • “Success is Counted Sweetest” A Comment on Value of Success: As this poem is about success, the speaker explains that failures can understand the meanings of success. She has used the images of soldiers to express her ideas about success. At the outset, she talks about soldiers who have won the war but still do not understand the real meanings of success because they have not experienced the pain of failure. Later, she refers to a dying soldier of the losing side, who can hear the victorious soldiers celebrating their day. Hence, the one who is losing the battle of his life can sense the true spirit of success. What enchants the readers is a stark comparison she has made between winning and losing sides to make clarify her points to the readers.
  • Major Themes in “Success is Counted Sweetest”: Need, success, and defeat are the major themes of this poem. The speaker presents her views about success by narrating various examples. She argues that success is valuable for those who have lost something in life. She adds that people who always win and taste success more often do not comprehend the true colors of success. Instead, it is valued and appreciated by those who experience defeats or failures in life.

Analysis of Literary Devices in “Success is Counted Sweetest”

Literary devices are tools that enable the writers to present their ideas, emotions, and feelings by using persuasive language. Emily Dickinson has also employed some literary devices in this poem to describe her feelings. The analysis of some of the literary devices used in this poem has been given below.

  1. Consonance: Consonance is the repetition of consonant sounds in the same line such as the sound of /r/ in “Requires sorest need” and the sound of /t/ in “The distant strains of triumph” and “Success is counted sweetest”.
  2. Imagery: Imagery is used to make readers perceive things involving their five senses. For example, “Not one of all the purple Host”; “The distant strains of triumph” and “Who took the Flag today.”
  3. Symbolism: Symbolism is a use of symbols to signify ideas and qualities by giving them symbolic meanings different from their literal meanings. “Nectar” symbolizes white victory and luxury while “The purple host” is the symbol of the royal army.
  4. Enjambment: It is defined as a thought or clause that does not come to an end at a line break; instead, it moves over the next line. For example,

“Success is counted sweetest
By those who ne’er succeed.”

  1. Metaphor: It is a figure of speech in which an implied comparison is made between objects different in nature. There is only one metaphor in the third line “to comprehend nectar”. Here, nectar is referring to the sweetness of victory.
  2. Assonance: Assonance is the repetition of vowel sounds in the same line. For example, the sound of /o/ in “Who took the Flag today” and the sound of /ee/ in “By those who ne’er succeed”.
  3. Syncope: It is a literary device that can be defined as the contraction or the shortening of a word by omitting sounds, syllables or letters from the middle of the word. The poet has omitted the letters from the middle of the word such as, “By those who ne’er succeed.”
  4. Paradox: A paradox is a statement that may seem contradictory but can be true. For example, “Success is counted sweetest; By those who ne’er succeed.” Here, the poet has used paradox to explain the importance of success.

Analysis of Poetic Devices in “Success is Counted Sweetest”

Poetic and literary devices are the same, but a few are used only in poetry. Here is the analysis of some of the poetic devices used in this rhyme.

  • Stanza: A stanza is a poetic form of some lines. There are three stanzas in this poem with each comprises four lines.
  • Quatrain: A quatrain is a four-lined stanza borrowed from Persian poetry. Here each stanza is quatrain.
  • Free Verse: Free verse is a type of poetry that does not contain patterns of rhyme or meter. This is a free verse poem with no strict rhyme or meter.
  • End Rhyme: End rhyme is used to make the stanza melodious. For example, “ear” and “clear.”
  • Iambic Trimeter: It is a type of meter having three iambs per line. The poem follows iambic trimester such as, “By those who ne’er suc

Quotes to be Used

The lines stated below can be used in motivational speeches to highlight the importance of success. These could also be used by parents to shape the thinking of their children.

“Success is counted sweetest
By those who ne’er succeed.
To comprehend a nectar
Requires sorest need.”

 

 

A Miss is as Good as a Mile

Meanings of “A Miss is as Good as a Mile”

The phrase means almost winning is still a failure even if you are closer the goal. In other words, it doesn’t matter whether you are good or bad; if you have missed the target after almost winning, it is still a miss. Similarly, it also means that when you fail, and there is no question of how close you were to success.

Origin of “A Miss is as Good as a Mile”

This proverbial expression is stated to have originated from Remaines of a Greater Worke Concerning Britaine by William Camden published in 1614. It was originally published as “An ynche in a misse is as good as an ell.” Later it was modified by James Kelly in his collection of Scottish Proverbs published in 1721 as A Complete Collection of Scottish Proverbs where it goes as “An Inch of a miss is as good as a span.”

It is further stated that this proverb or saying dates back to the 18th century when it was first used in The American Museum, a journal in its third volume in 1788. It states the proverb as “a miss is as good as a mile” in the same word, as it appears today.

Examples from Literature

Example #1

As Bad as a Mile by Philip Larkin

Watching the shied core
Striking the basket, skidding across the floor,
Shows less and less of luck, and more and more

Of failure spreading back up the arm
Earlier and earlier, the unraised hand calm,
The apple unbitten in the palm.

This is a complete poem by Philip Larkin titled as “As Bad as a Mile.” It almost explains the same point as this proverbial expression gives. That is why its title is nearly the same. The major point given in this poem is that the poet has eaten the apple and tried to throw it in the basket nearby. However, he keeps on missing again and again. The poet does not lose heart and starts it again, but it is again a miss, which points to the failure. The proximity of the basket explains that it does not matter whether the distance is a mile or an inch; the poet has missed it.

Example #2

From Collected Letters of Joseph Conrad Volume 4 by Joseph Conrad

“I perceive you have been moving briskly about this distract realm, but as it was in the interest of the justice, I won’t lecture you on these new gad-about habits. Nothing, however, can excuse motor-car collisions. It’s all very well to say that a miss is as good as a mile but it’s a nerve shaking experience. Did Ada feel it at all afterwards? Some years ago, we had an accident of that sort, in a modest way. We ran merely into a baker’s cart on a slant and took it backwards into the hedge. The road was covered with bread. After that first scare, it was rather funny (the baker’s man was a stutterer) but I could not sleep for three nights afterwards.”

This passage has been taken from the letters of Joseph Conrad, the famous novel writer. He has used this phrase in this passage in the meanings of an accident. He is stating how habits sometimes save people. He happens to meet with an accident in his vehicle that has shaken his nerves as he says using this phrase that “a miss is as good as a mile.” He means that he has saved his life whatever situation it might have been.

Example #3

Extract from – Clothes, Friends and Close Calls by Ron Harvey

“Back to Justin, the Nick of Thyme. Justin was always flipping nickels with his knuckles. One day, a not-so-sharp shooter of arrows of the crossbow crossed Beaux (the river between Bye and Thyme) and saw Justin beneath the bridge knuckle-flipping nickels. Well, it just so happened that the not-so-sharp shooter was a miss. A miss couldn’t resist taking a shot at one of the flipping nickels. Smiling as she drew back the bow, she put away the pencil and paper and let the arrow fly (an arrow fly is a small fly lost in Thyme). I’m sure you’ve heard that a miss is as good as a smile.”

The phrase has been used in this passage taken from the story “Clothes, Friends and Close Calls” by Ron Harvey, but with a slight twist in the “mile” which has been put as “smile” instead. However, this phrase starts unfolding from the third line, where a not-so-sharp-shooter misses something. Justine, by the end, realizes, that it is not “as good as a smile.”

Example #4

From Popular Saying Dissected by A. Wallace

“It has been pointed out that in the old volumes of Romances, two knights, Amys and Milles, were described as being of equal prowess. This fact may have given rise to the saying, “Amys is ass good as a Milles,” ultimately adapted to the requirements of our every-day phrase in the shape of “a miss is as good as a mile.” Opposed to this solution, however, stands the fact that there has always existed the proverb in the form, “An inch in a miss is as good as an ell,” in the latter part of which phrase the word mile has later been substituted for “ell,” induced by a slight similarity in the sound of the two words, together with the obvious gain in alliteration. We have more than once in the preceding pages had occasion to point out the force of the latter factor in phrase making. This phrase doubtless became later abbreviated into the form – “A miss is as good as a mile.”

This passage is the explanation of how this phrase might have been formed. This tells the story of two knights named Amys and Milles, which were later twisted into “miss” and mile” and transformed into this phrase.

Examples in Sentences as Literary Devices

Example #1: “He has failed to hit an elk during hunting by a little margin, but for him, it is a miss as good as a mile.” Here the phrase itself is a metaphor. It could be a double metaphor as well, but in both, it is compared with the miss. The first miss is of the hunter while the second it is compared with the miss in the phrase.

Example #2: “He could not hit the ball when his stumps went flying during the match. This is a miss as good as a mile.” The phrase has again been used in a metaphorical sense with the miss.

Example #3: “Like a miss as good as a mile, he loses his heart and throws away the gun.” In this sentence, the phrase is given as a simile as the word ‘like’ suggests.

Example #4: A miss is as good as a mile has taught him that he cannot win wherever he may hit unless he hits the bull’s eye.

Example #5: “A miss is as good as a mile, and a mile is as good as a miss” is almost the same thing.” Here the phrase has been reversed and used as chiasmus for impacts.

A Little Knowledge Is A Dangerous Thing

Meaning of “A Little Knowledge Is A Dangerous Thing”

This proverb ‘A Little Knowledge Is A Dangerous Thing’ means a person is sharing his views with others and doesn’t have enough knowledge of a particular subject, especially medical, religion, or education field, it can lead to dangerous situations. People with limited experience can often mislead people. Innocent people or people with a lack of information may easily believe the person pretending to know everything because most of the time, they are very convincing. A person with a little information and knowledge can also become a cause of suffering and even death due to their overconfidence.

Origin of “A Little Knowledge Is A Dangerous Thing”

It is stated that this proverb has been coined by Alexander Pope. He wrote in his essay An Essay on Criticism in 1709 that “A little learning is a dangerous thing.” Later in 1774, a magazine, Lady’s Complete Magazine used it in its second volume changing it to “A little knowledge is a dangerous thing.” Since then, it has become a routine to use the proverb in almost in the same words as it has appeared in its early usage.

Examples in Literature

Example #1

A Little Learning by Alexander Pope

A little learning is a dangerous thing ;
Drink deep, or taste not the Pierian spring :
There shallow draughts intoxicate the brain,
And drinking largely sobers us again.
Fired at first sight with what the Muse imparts,
In fearless youth we tempt the heights of Arts ;
While from the bounded level of our mind
Short views we take, nor see the lengths behind,
But, more advanced, behold with strange surprise
New distant scenes of endless science rise !
So pleased at first the towering Alps we try,
Mount o’er the vales, and seem to tread the sky ;
The eternal snows appear already past,
And the first clouds and mountains seem the last ;
But those attained, we tremble to survey
The growing labours of the lengthened way ;
The increasing prospect tires our wandering eyes,
Hills peep o’er hills, and Alps on Alps arise !

The poem starts with this adage, highlighting that as soon as we start having a little knowledge, it intoxicates us with pride and arrogance. However, as soon as a person becomes more knowledgeable, he becomes sober. The poet has beautifully used metaphors to convey that when a person does not get more knowledge and does not become an expert, he often becomes haughty and mislead others. The use of this proverb in the first line correctly highlights the main idea of the poem.

Example #2

A Little Knowledge Is a Dangerous Thing: Understanding Our Global Knowledge Economy by Dale Neef

A management consultant, a strategist of corporate policy and a recognized author, Dale Neef, has shed light on the importance of knowledge and its management in the world of business. He has highlighted the importance of global culture and its knowledge to improve personal economics and economy at large. The book highlights that now the business world and businesses no longer accept people having no educational or professional background. If a person with limited education enters the world of business, he faces hurdles and outright losses. Therefore, Dale Neef has aptly used this proverb in the title of the book.

Example #3

A Little Knowledge (Is a Dangerous Thing) sung by Tower of Tower

I always knew just what to do
Till I met you now nothing is certain
You offered me food from the tree
Just like a story of Adam and Eve
A perfect love is all that I was living for
(All of a sudden life was turning upside down)
She came near, she whispered in my ear,
She seems to know the reason why….she said

Chorus

A little knowledge is a dangerous thing (yeaah!)
A little knowledge is a dangerous thing, baby

Written by Castillo Emilio and colleagues, this is a powerful song sung by Tower of Tower, an Oklahoma based band. This song has a chorus which repeats the proverb several times to transform it into a powerful refrain. The song has mixed love and religion in a way that it ends up stressing upon the feminine quality of giving information or knowledge to the lovers. The refrain from chorus adds beauty and melody to the song in a way that it becomes a melodic refrain of how a little knowledge becomes risky for a person.

Examples in Sentences

Example  #1: “He knows that a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, the reason that he is going for a terminal degree in his subject.” This is a simple sentence where this proverb has been used in a metaphorical sense but not as a complete metaphor. It is a metaphor for knowledge that is compared to something dangerous.

Example #2: “Like a little knowledge is a dangerous thing, a little water is a risky thing when passing the Sahara Desert, for it is such a vast expanse that this water dries up during the first journey.” Here this proverb has equated the scarcity of water with the littleness of knowledge and compared both with each other. As this comparison has a word “like,” it shows that it is a simile which has compared the little knowledge with the little water and the impacts of this knowledge with the scarcity of water. This could be called an extended metaphor.

Example #3: “A little knowledge is a dangerous thing, especially the way the counselors advised him to take medication without a doctor’s approval.”

Example #4: “Don’t think him a little knowledge is a dangerous thing; he has studied a lot and earned the final degree from Oxford.” This sentence is using this proverb in a metaphorical sense for a person that he is not.

Example #5: “A little knowledge is a dangerous thing like a little experience is risky work.” Here the proverb has been compared with the experience and is used as a simile.

Bright Star, Would I Were Stedfast as Thou Art

Bright Star, Would I Were Stedfast as Thou Art

by John Keats

Bright star, would I were stedfast as thou art—
Not in lone splendour hung aloft the night
And watching, with eternal lids apart,
Like nature’s patient, sleepless Eremite,
The moving waters at their priestlike task
Of pure ablution round earth’s human shores,
Or gazing on the new soft-fallen mask
Of snow upon the mountains and the moors—
No—yet still stedfast, still unchangeable,
Pillow’d upon my fair love’s ripening breast,
To feel for ever its soft fall and swell,
Awake for ever in a sweet unrest,
Still, still to hear her tender-taken breath,
And so live ever—or else swoon to death.

Summary of Bright Star, Would I Were Stedfast as Thou Art

  •  Popularity of “Bright Star, Would I Were Stedfast as Thou Art”: This poem is also known as ‘Bright Star, Would I Were Steadfast as Thou Art’. It is one of the best and famous written sonnets by John Keats, a popular English poet. It is favorite on account of its theme of natural beauty. It was first published in 1838. The poem captures the magnificent beauty of nature, its creation, and love. A few scholars also assume that the sonnet is addressed to ‘Polaris, a North Star’. It also gives an insight into the speaker’s desire to be eternal like the star he adores.
  • “Bright Star, Would I Were Steadfast as Thou Art” As a Representative of Love: As this poem is about the beautiful star, the speaker directly addresses the star and wishes to remain steadfast like it. He adores its unchangeable quality and desires to attain that quality. However, he soon realizes that the star is isolated from the rest of the world and can only observe life and the beauty of nature but cannot experience it. Also, it will never taste the fruits of love. Therefore, he decides to remain steadfast and immutable in his love like that star but not in isolation. He wants to live forever with his love. He believes that death is better than having to live without his love. What stays in the minds of the readers is the metaphorical comparison he draws to show his pure love for his beloved.
  • Major Themes in “Bright Star, Would I Were Steadfast as Thou Art”: Love, isolation and natural beauty are the major themes of this poem. The speaker observes certain qualities of the bright star and wants to adopt them. He discusses two things in the poem – the steadfastness of the star and its isolation. Thus, he wishes to be eternal with his beloved like the star but refuses to live a lonely life. He wants to stay close with his beloved.

Analysis of Literary Devices in “Bright Star, Would I Were Steadfast as Thou Art”

Literary devices are tools that the writers use to shape their ideas and emotions. Their usage makes the text captivating and opens it up to multiple interpretations. Keats has also used some literary devices in this poem to explain his ideas of pure love. The analysis of some of the literary devices used in this poem has been stated below.

  • Assonance: Assonance is the repetition of vowel sounds in the same line such as the sound of /a/ in “Like nature’s patient, sleepless Eremite” and the sound of /e/ in “No—yet still steadfast, still unchangeable.”
  • Symbolism: Symbolism is the use of symbols to signify ideas and qualities by giving them symbolic meanings different from their literal meanings. In the sonnet ‘Star’ symbolizes desire.
  • Consonance: Consonance is the repetition of consonant sounds in the same line such as the sound of /l/ in “To feel for ever its soft fall and swell” and the sound of /n/ in “Of snow upon the mountains and the moors.”
  • Simile: It is a figure of speech in which an object or a person is compared with something else to make the meanings clear to the readers. For example, “Bright star, would I were steadfast as thou art.” Here the poem is attempting to compare himself with the star.
  • Personification: Personification is to give human qualities to inanimate objects. For example, ‘And watching, with eternal lids apart’ as if the star is human that can perform certain actions.
  • Imagery: Imagery is used to make readers perceive things involving their five senses. For example, “And watching, with eternal lids apart “; ” The moving waters at their priestlike task ” and ” Pillow’d upon my fair love’s ripening breast”.
  • Enjambment: It is defined as a thought or clause that does not come to an end at a line break; instead, it moves over the next line. For example,

Or gazing on the new soft-fallen mask
Of snow upon the mountains and the moors—
No—yet still steadfast, still unchangeable.”

Analysis of Poetic Devices in “Bright Star, Would I Were Steadfast as Thou Art”

Poetic and literary devices are the same, but a few are used only in poetry. Here is the analysis of some of the poetic devices used in this rhyme.

  • Sonnet: A sonnet is a fourteen-line poem with a single idea float throughout the poem.
  • Quatrain: A quatrain is a four-lined stanza borrowed from Persian poetry. There are three quatrains in this poem.
  • Couplet: There are two constructive lines in a couplet, usually in the same meter and are joined by rhyme. This sonnet ends with a couplet, which generally reveals the central idea of the poem.
  • Rhyme Scheme: The poem follows the ABAB CDCD EFEF GG rhyme scheme.
  • End Rhyme: End rhyme is used to make the stanza melodious. For example, “art/apart”, “night/Eremite” and “task/mask.”

Quotes to be Used

The lines stated below can be used to describe the magnificent beauty of nature. This line can also be used to explain the power of nature.

“The moving waters at their priestlike task
Of pure ablution round earth’s human shores,
Or gazing on the new soft-fallen mask
Of snow upon the mountains and the moors.”